FAQS ABOUT GARDASIL:

Here are some answers to questions we’ve heard from parents just like you. While we hope these questions are helpful, it’s important to talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional for more information about HPV and GARDASIL. In addition, you can read the Patient Product Information or the Prescribing Information for GARDASIL.

Print ALL questions Is GARDASIL only for girls and young women?

No. GARDASIL is indicated to help protect 9- to 26-year-old males and females against approximately 90% of genital warts cases. GARDASIL does not treat genital warts.

GARDASIL may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types or against diseases not caused by HPV.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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Is the same vaccine given to both girls and boys?

Yes. Boys receive the same vaccine that girls do. GARDASIL helps protect males and females against approximately 90% of genital warts cases and about 80% of anal cancer cases. GARDASIL also helps protect females ages 9 to 26 from about 75% of cervical cancer cases, against approximately 70% of vaginal cancer cases, and up to 50% of vulvar cancer cases.

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL is not for women who are pregnant.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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If my child is 11 or 12 years of age, are they too young to be vaccinated with GARDASIL?

No. Getting GARDASIL at age 11 or 12, before exposure to HPV, helps protect him or her from certain HPV-related diseases when he or she grows up.

The duration of protection of GARDASIL has not been established.

Like other vaccines, GARDASIL works to help prevent illness. GARDASIL helps prevent certain HPV-related diseases caused by HPV Types 6, 11, 16, and 18. The time to vaccinate is before there is any exposure to these HPV types.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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How safe is GARDASIL?

The safety of a vaccine is an important part of its story.

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL is not for women who are pregnant.

The common side effects include pain, swelling, itching, bruising, and redness at the injection site, headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and fainting. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your child’s doctor or health care professional may ask your child to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after getting GARDASIL. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your child’s doctor or health care professional.

As with all approved vaccines, the CDC and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will continue to closely monitor the safety of GARDASIL.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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Could my child get HPV or any disease caused by HPV from GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant]?

No. He or she cannot get HPV or any disease caused by HPV from GARDASIL. That’s because there is no live virus in the vaccine.

Instead, GARDASIL contains a protein that helps the body’s immune system produce antibodies against HPV—without causing an infection.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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What are the ingredients in GARDASIL?

The ingredients are proteins of HPV Types 6, 11, 16, and 18, amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, yeast protein, sodium chloride, L-histidine, polysorbate 80, sodium borate, and water for injection.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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What if I can’t afford GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant] for my child?

GARDASIL is part of the Vaccines for Children Program, a federal program that helps to provide free vaccines to children and adolescents 18 years and younger who are either Medicaid eligible, American Indian or Alaskan Native, or uninsured, or whose health insurance does not cover shots.

Additional information regarding the Vaccines for Children Program can be found at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/index.html.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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What does the CDC say about HPV vaccination?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends routine vaccination with GARDASIL for girls and boys ages 11 to 12.

The CDC also recommends vaccination for young women ages 13 through 26 and young men ages 13 through 21 that have not already been vaccinated.

The CDC states that GARDASIL can be given to young men ages 22 through 26, if they and their doctor decide it’s right for them.

Additional medical organizations that support the CDC recommendations for HPV vaccination:

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
  • American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)
  • American Cancer Society (ACS)*
  • American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)*

*ACS and ACOG support is specific to females

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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Why do I need to vaccinate my child now if he or she is not sexually active?

Exposure can happen with any kind of adolescent experimentation that involved genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn’t necessary.

You have the chance to help protect your child before he or she is exposed to HPV. Like other vaccines your child may have received, GARDASIL® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant] works to help prevent illness.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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Will my daughter still need to get Pap tests in the future?

Yes. Pap tests (used to screen for cervical cancer) will play a key role in protecting your daughter’s health as she gets older since GARDASIL does not protect against all types of HPV. Pap tests are proven to help save lives by looking for abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix before they have the chance to become precancers or cancer.

Your daughter’s doctor or health care professional can tell you when your daughter’s first Pap test should be. In the meantime, it’s never too early to teach your daughter good health care habits.

For more information on GARDASIL, talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional.

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